Nutrition and Lifestyle

What do you say when a pretty wacky idea is ostensibly promoted by a well-respected scientist? Well, you (politely) have to say that the idea is rather wacky. The idea I'm thinking of was suggested by leading neuroscientist Wolfram Schultz of Cambridge University. Professor Schultz' research has focused on the roles and activities of brain neurotransmitters, and one of them, dopamine, is reportedly the basis for this latest idea.

And the suggestion is to combat obesity by mandating that fast foods and so-called "junk foods" be packaged in plain brown wrappers, much as pornography used to be in more discreet times. So...

It's that time of the year when the Environmental Working Group produces its "Dirty Dozen List" - foods they believe you should fear the most.

That's bad news for farmers and certainly poor people in America. Because even if you score 99.9% on this test, you could still fail. That reason is because EWG creates a Bell Curve for food.

Each year, as part of the Pesticide Data Program, the USDA engages in random sampling of pesticide residues to confirm the safety of food, and each year the EWG takes their results and manipulates the findings to claim just the opposite. But for a lot longer than the USDA has been testing for pesticides, we have known that 'the dose makes the poison.' We're now in a world...

Sure, we all know that it's important to be physically active to help achieve and maintain a healthy body weight and perhaps diminish the risk of heart disease, some cancers and overall mortality. But how much is enough? Does one really have to exercise 5 days per week, 30 minutes at a clip to accrue health benefits, and does that exercise have to be vigorous or will a brisk walk suffice? The World Health Organization recommends:

  • Adults aged 18–64 should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or do at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the week or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity...

Here we go again:

From Yahoo: Bacon, soda & too few nuts tied to big portion of US deaths

From NBC: These 10 Foods Affect Your Risk of Heart Disease the Most - Just 10 foods account for nearly half of all heart disease deaths in the U.S., researchers reported Tuesday.

From Reuters: Poor diet tied to...

In a recent documentary, religion scholar Reza Aslan ate a small piece of human brains. That was inadvisable.

The purpose of his six-episode CNN series "Believer," according to the Los Angeles Times, is to explore misunderstood faiths. Of course, given the choice of good journalism or sensationalism, Dr. Aslan chose the latter. In one episode, he hung out with the Aghoris, a small, fringe Hindu cult with extremely bizarre practices that are meant as a rebuke to...

They're "hooking" up.

They've got more access to safe-sex and birth-control information – at their fingertips via their smartphone – than any generation in human history.

They've got access to a tech-filled world of dating apps that can produce a prospective partner in as little time as it takes to hail an Uber.

So, naturally, Millennials are having more sex than anyone their age has had in recent years, right?

Wrong. Just the opposite.

That's according to a new study published this week, which found that Americans are having less sex now than in generations past – which includes Millennials having less than those at the same age of the previous generation, a conclusion from a previous ...

Here are the headlines:

From UPI: Study links soy consumption to breast cancer survival.

From Reuters: Soy tied to longer life after breast cancer

From NPR: New Study Reveals Benefits Of Soy For Breast Cancer Survivors

From NBC: Soy Doesn’t Worsen Breast Cancer and May Prevent It, Study Finds

And from...

ACSH followers are clear about the problems associated with fake science — from the promotion of supposed obesity "cures" by Dr. Oz to the nonsense of hydrogen-infused water, we've covered a myriad of pseudoscience. Some, such as supplements containing aristolochic acid, cause life-threatening effects, while others simply cause users to waste their money and avoid more effective treatments. One effect we've not really paid enough attention to, though, is the effect on fauna and flora all over the world. A recent article on Real Clear Science points to several...

http://cdn.nutrition.org/content/early/2017/02/08/cdn.117.000422

Dairy-derived foods —milk, cheeses, yogurt, etc. — are nutrient-rich dietary components. Fluid milk is a top provider of riboflavin, vitamin D, calcium and other minerals to the diets of adult Americans, according to the USDA. And yet, milk and other dairy foods are under constant attack from a variety of groups who persist in denigrating its value. For example animal rights groups who want everyone to become strictly vegan, busily attack virtually every positive attribute of dairy and other animal - derived foods. In addition, they...

Soda taxes are many things. Obnoxious. Unscientific. An example of government overreach. The one thing they aren't is racist, yet precisely that case was made by Seattle Times reporter Gene Balk1

His argument goes like this: Blacks and Hispanics consume more sugary beverages than whites and Asians, while whites and Asians drink more diet beverages than blacks and Hispanics. Because the tax does not apply to diet beverages, it is racist. 

Supporting data provided by the Seattle...