breastfeeding

Since “fake news” seems to be the catch all buzz worthy expression of the moment, we also don’t need to look very far to find common medical falsehoods that tend to originate from the Hollywood stratosphere. Whether it is a press statement about a celebrity or a concept in a film, the nugget for fodder gets picked up by all media forms and insidiously spread.

Especially in the realm of celebrity—a category many politicians tend to fall into these days, there is what gets publicized and the truth. Being a physician who still believes in the right to privacy and is bound by certain codes of ethics and regulations, the standard for the release of health information is pretty clear and reflects the fact that the public is not entitled to know the details of another person’s health...

For someone who is not a fan of the “trigger warning,”  I can report —upon opening my medscape email which contained a Reuter’s Health press release— even I was triggered.  It’s just my definition incites annoyance and frustration, not fear or anger. 

Triggered by redundant studies of things we already know.  Triggered by work that has been repeatedly learned, understood and implemented in actual medical practice.  Triggered by an understanding when such studies are performed resources are diverted away from greater risk, greater reward endeavors.  Triggered by written language that tends to mischaracterize what practicing physicians know and knew before the publication of said study.  Triggered by a narrative that, if accurate, further perpetuates the notion that there exists—...

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In 2015, there were at least 140 million live births worldwide. Less than half of these newborns were put to the breast within an hour of birth, UNICEF laments. 77 million neonates worldwide were denied the earliest possible initiation of breastfeeding, according to their report "From the First Hour of Life"?

Why is this a big deal? More importantly to those of us concerned about public health, how valid is any of the data they're using to...

shutterstock_238702912First of all, by "fraught" I mean some thing, situation or decision attended by worry or stress. And why should baby feeding be so considered? After all, as mammals we humans typically have the ability to breastfeed our offspring. And as inhabitants of a technologically advanced, developed country, we have the opportunity to choose one of a number of nutritionally complete formulas designed for the same purpose. So what's the issue (or issues)? And what do feminists think about it?

The answer is — it depends.

The basic feminist stance is that women should be able, and society should...

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Breast or bottle? That choice should be freely available to a new mother with no coercion or misinformation to push her decision one way or another. She should be able to pick whichever method, or combination of methods, best suits her, her baby and family.

But according to a new book, Lactivism by Courtney Jung (recently reviewed...

86804963(1)Mothers trying to decide whether or not to nurse their children are faced with a sea of confusing information. But despite the conflicting information found on the internet and elsewhere, mothers aren't left with a clear-cut answer. And as for women who do choose to breastfeed, it's not often clear which scenarios call for a suspension of the practice, such as when the mother has the flu.

Mothers looking to the CDC for information will be disappointed. On its website, in the section on caring for this population, there's no mention of whether mothers have to...

244d767f71a52049f5a1dac82018d47bIt s well known that breastfeeding is beneficial for both mother and child in a variety of ways in addition to the transfer of natural antibodies, it is associated with lower risks of allergic diseases, lower respiratory infections and middle ear infections. Indeed, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months of their lives.

Now a new...

The latest in health news: EWG's Dirty Dozen more like Dummy Dozen, measuring kids' medicine inaccurately lands many in the ER, and buying breast milk online could be dangerous!

86804963(1)The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends mothers breastfeed their babies exclusively for up to six months and then a combination of solid foods and breastfeeding from six months to one year (their official policy makes no mention of formula, although they do allow complementary foods). The Academy says that breastfeeding reduces the risk of serious colds, respiratory tract infections (including pneumonia), ear infections, sudden infant death syndrome, type 1 diabetes, obesity, gastrointestinal tract infections and many other health problems. A...