diabetes mellitus

 

“An aspirin a day keeps the doctor away” has been the mantra for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) since the early 2000s, but that seems to be changing in some cases.

It is well documented that taking aspirin helps prevent the recurrence of heart attack, stroke, and other vascular events after they have already occurred - known as “secondary prevention”.  But there is debate over the benefits of taking aspirin in people without a history of prior cardiovascular disease - primary prevention.  The current consensus advocates using low-dose aspirin, for primary prevention, in certain high risk groups: those with advanced age, diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking etc.  Not so, says a new ...

177851075 (1)Despite an increase in awareness and public health efforts, the diabetes epidemic in America persists. The CDC estimates 21 million Americans were living with diabetes as of 2010 with 1.5 million new cases being diagnosed each year. There are also an estimated 8 million Americans unknowingly living with diabetes.

In 2008, in response to this growing problem, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) advised all physicians to screen for diabetes in any patient with a sustained blood pressure greater than 135/80. They based this recommendation on the prevalence of the diabetes in society as well as the...

scaleA higher BMI may lead to an increased risk for diabetes complications, a new study finds. Using data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), researchers examined relations between excess weight and time to first diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and its complications. Medicare claims data were available for 1991 2010. Over 14,500 beneficiaries were included in the study, and all were older than 64 years of age, were not enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, and did not have a diabetes mellitus diagnosis at the time of their first MCBS interview.

Among...