fake news

Politics makes utter fools out of otherwise rational people. The vitriol aimed at President George W. Bush by his political opponents caused psychiatrist and political commentator Charles Krauthammer to coin the tongue-in-cheek term "Bush Derangement Syndrome." It caught on. Pundits subsequently seized upon the terms "Obama Derangement Syndrome" and "Trump Derangement Syndrome."

Now, it appears as if some psychologists want to give these satirical diagnoses an air of medical authority. An article in Kaiser Health News, which was (unbelievably) reprinted by...

Since “fake news” seems to be the catch all buzz worthy expression of the moment, we also don’t need to look very far to find common medical falsehoods that tend to originate from the Hollywood stratosphere. Whether it is a press statement about a celebrity or a concept in a film, the nugget for fodder gets picked up by all media forms and insidiously spread.

Especially in the realm of celebrity—a category many politicians tend to fall into these days, there is what gets publicized and the truth. Being a physician who still believes in the right to privacy and is bound by certain codes of ethics and regulations, the standard for the release of health information is pretty clear and reflects the fact that the public is not entitled to know the details of another person’s health...

Co-Authored By Pamela Paresky, Ph.D.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently advised parents to stop using and immediately discard certain homeopathic teething products for infants because they contain belladonna, a toxic chemical in amounts that cannot be verified as safe. To medical professionals, this is no surprise. Despite the fact that many natural products contain harmful ingredients, the FDA has been playing catch-up ever since these “non-medical” products began to saturate the market after the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 was passed over the protests of the medical community, and allowed sale of almost anything with...

After more than six years in science journalism, I have reached two very disturbing conclusions about the craft.

First, too many science journalists don't actually possess a well-rounded knowledge of science. In many cases, regular reporters are asked to cover complex science and health stories. What we end up with is entirely predictable: Articles that are nothing more than rehashed press releases, topped with click-bait headlines based on exaggerations and misunderstandings of the original research. That's how a nonsensical story like Nutella causing cancer goes...

An infant in France died after being given Vitamin D by his parents. Clearly, this is a tragedy. Yet how journalists are spinning this is a tragedy too. 

AOL leads with “French baby dies after taking product to treat Vitamin D deficiency” and their quote, "Investigations are under way to establish the precise cause of death and to see if it could be linked to Uvesterol D," said the French medical safety watchdog in a statement.” 

The BBC tells us “French baby death linked to vitamin dose” and from the headline you would think that the vitamin treatment was responsible. The...