Guns

Mass shootings and terrorism. These two topics continue to strike fear into the hearts of Americans everywhere.

It makes sense why. Their randomness instills us with fear. The shooters often look deranged, and the images shown in the media are gruesome. And because of the cynical (but true) journalistic maxim, "If it bleeds, it leads," we are guaranteed weeks of discussion after every incident.

But boring things are far deadlier. According to the most recent data from the CDC, accidents killed 136,053 Americans in 2014, making them the #4 leading cause of death1. Included in that number is accidental carbon monoxide poisoning, which kills on average 374 people every single year2...

Atul Gawande popularized the concept of medical ‘hot spotting” - originally, hot spotting was the practice of focusing on known crime areas and it became vital for reducing crime in New York City - to health matters in a 2011 article in the New Yorker. Medical hot spotting was using data to identify patterns (models) to identify which groups can be targeted for further intervention pr even prevention. Ben Green, et al., in this week’s JAMA Internal Medicine, extend hot spotting in a new direction, to rampant gun violence in Chicago, so I am wading...