immunizations

Every year, the recommended childhood and adolescent vaccine schedules are reviewed, adjusted and approved by the following governing bodies:  American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP),  and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

The 2017 revisions are now published for those 0 to 18 years of age with some of the recent changes listed here—see “notes” section for accessing complete information:

Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine

This vaccine protects against certain strains of the...

lobster-1206051-mCalifornia seems to get all the attention when it comes to the anti-vaxx movement, but the epidemic of non-medical exemptions exists in other states too, and in many...

Hundreds153988137 of people, reportedly standing in line for hours, showed up in Sacramento to voice their baseless fears over the bill, which if passed will force many to either submit to protecting their kids or home school them. The committee listened to a spattering of pseudo-science and anecdotal testimony for over two hours. Someone incorrectly pointed out that vaccines contain questionable materials while another claimed the bill would create institutional discrimination. Senator Connie Leyva went as far as arguing that the bill would put up an obstacle between children and education, which is not a very consistent position for Mrs....

Measles is Back!A large Canadian study shows that infants who receive the MMR vaccine (protective against measles, mumps and rubella) and at the same visit receive the varicella (chickenpox) vaccine termed MMRV have an approximately double the risk of febrile seizures within the 7-10 days thereafter, as compared with those who got the 2 shots separately (MMR+V). However, the absolute rate of such transient, self-limited seizures is minuscule, whether occurring after MMRV or MMR+V.

The group of researchers from the University of...

455195407The Amish typically have very low vaccination rates for three reasons: First, in their culture, they have not been exposed to the overall benefits of children s vaccinations; second, they believe that vaccines may put their children at risk of certain illnesses or autism, myths which have been debunked numerous times; third, some Amish believe that vaccinations imply that one is putting faith in man over God. Well, hopefully the Amish may be starting to change their minds about vaccinations with the measles...

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An article in today s Wall Street Journal notes the trend in several recalcitrant states towards making evasion of vaccination somewhat more difficult for fearful, superstitious parents. The states highlighted are Oregon and Colorado. In the latter state, only 85.7 percent of the kindergarteners were protected against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), while in OR, fully 6.4 percent of the kids were exempted...