pharmaceuticals

Dr. Cox: Did you actually just page me to find out how much Tylenol to give to Mrs. Lendsner?

J.D.: I was worried that it could exacerbate the patient's... 

Dr. Cox: It's regular strength Tylenol. Here's what-chya do: Get her to open her mouth, take a handful, and throw it at her. Whatever sticks, that's the correct dosage.

Of Dr. Cox's many rants on the comedy show Scrubs, this is definitely one of the funnier and more memorable1. However, it isn't quite accurate.

Tylenol (a.k.a. acetaminophen or paracetamol2), unbeknownst to many, is actually a fairly toxic drug. Its ubiquity has lulled us into a false sense of security about its safety. But as our resident chemist Dr. Josh Bloom...

The rising price for EpiPens, a drug delivery system that is crucial for persons experiencing potentially life-threatening allergic reactions, has resulted in outrage.

The price increase, from about US$94 for a two-pack of injectable epinephrine to more than $600 in just nine years, has...

Silkworm cocoon. (Krish Dulal/Wikipedia) Silkworm cocoon. (Krish Dulal/Wikipedia)

 

Unlike draping yourself in velvet, which is not socially acceptable, silk remains perfectly fashionable. In fact, it is all the rage at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Tufts University, where a research group led by David Kaplan is literally wrapping silk around everything it can get its hands on. In 2012, I reported on a...

Counterfeit DrugsA new investigative report reveals that approximately 94 percent of prescription drugs purchased via the Internet are less than what they seem. Or more. Or lacking in any active ingredient. Or, worst of all, toxic.

So why do it?

An organization based in France, the Institute for Research Against Counterfeit Medicines (IRACRM), aims to educate the public and the authorities on the scourge of counterfeit drugs. Their research shows that of 331,430 websites they monitor, over 94...

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 2.12.25 PMAt ACSH, we are always on the lookout for bad headlines. Thanks to CBS News, we have a real beauty. It s so bad that, despite the fact there are more than 10 months left in the year, this one will come out on top (bottom?). It s that bad.

Here is their headline from February 11th: New York, New England groundwater teeming with pharmaceuticals.

It s unknown what CBS s intention was, but we can hazard a guess. Sensationalist headlines sure do get attention. This one is a beauty. And if the headline even remotely matched the actual science behind the story,...

In Forbes, Dr. Josh Bloom, American Council on Science and Health Director of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, and Dr. Henry I. Miller of the Hoover Institute, note that the development of pharmaceuticals is among the riskiest of businesses and that it now takes 10-15 years for a pharmaceutical company to get a new drug approved, and on average the cost exceeds $2.5 billion. To establish its safety and effectiveness, a candidate drug or vaccine undergoes a lengthy process of laboratory,...[Read more].

Screen Shot 2014-05-12 at 1.21.41 PMWhile it s good to see that The New York Times is taking note of the crisis of antibiotic resistance, it is unfortunate that they could not be a little more honest. In their lead editorial in Sunday s paper (May 11th) they call attention to the problem and discuss their ideas about the reasons why we are now in this mess; however, they (intentionally?) omitted perhaps the most important reason why we find ourselves in this dangerous place...

244d767f71a52049f5a1dac82018d47bIf there s anything that strikes fear into the hearts of new mothers, it is the thought of harming their newborns by taking a medication that might get into their breast milk and affect their babies.

But a new report by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), which was published online in the August 26th journal ...

aspirinPharmaceuticals are prescribed for individuals with individual health problems. Because a drug will help one person with a particular condition doesn t necessarily mean it will help someone else; indeed, taking medicine meant for someone else might actually be dangerous. That should be clear to most people. Yet about ten percent of Americans admit to taking a prescription drug they haven t been prescribed, according to a Reuters poll described in the...