pheromones

The existence of human pheromones is hotly debated. Ask any woman who has lived in a college dorm and she is likely to tell you that they exist because the women synced their menstrual cycles when living together. But, anecdotal evidence not withstanding, the scientific evidence for pheromones in humans is lacking. 

However, just because human pheromones have not been identified yet does not mean that they don't exist. Most other species use them for social cues such as mating - why not humans? Following that line of thinking, scientists are still looking for them - using interesting experimental setups to do it.

A recent study,...

Pheromones have long been credited (or blamed) for our behavioral choices, most notably our choice of sexual partners. The idea that we could base such a seemingly personal choice on a unconscious chemical signal is fascinating but, is it real? 

The answer is probably not - despite it being a widely held belief that humans make pheromones that affect our behavior - there is no scientific evidence to support that this is the case. But, it is still a question that garners much attention. In fact, Science magazine's special 125th anniversary issue, included the question “Do pheromones influence human behavior?” on the list of 100 of the most interesting questions still...

shutterstock_77196874Many animals make and secrete pheromones in order to control social behaviors, the most well understood of which is mating. In fact, you may have (wrongfully) blamed pheromones for that bad date that you went on last month.

Pheromones are the artificial heart of a huge industry that packages and sells products oozing with the false hope of attracting more sexual partners. There are dozens of perfumes, oils, soaps and even patches on the market, each with the promise of increasing sexual desirability with a spray behind the ears. Although none of these products will bring the results...