pregnancy

Who among us hasn’t been tormented by the itch after a mosquito bite? This is due to the histamine release at the offending site. In some, it is a bit more exaggerated and an oral antihistamine or topical cream with the passage of time does the trick to provide optimal relief.

Now imagine that intensity and urge to scratch diffusely spread over your entire body in a constant and unrelenting fashion. Night and day. Where a more significant underlying cause won’t be benefitted and cured by time or a Benadryl, for instance.

That is called chronic “generalized pruritus” and its etiologies can range from the readily fixable to the necessitation of a liver transplant in those where treatment for the symptom might be refractory. In the extreme, sleep is impaired and even...

Children make you lose your mind, at least that's what a first-of-its-kind study says. But worry not, mothers-to-be, because according to researchers, that's probably good thing!

The study  — published in Nature Neuroscience — explains that while we've known the radical hormone changes and biological adaptations that come with bearing a child, psychological changes have remained unknown, perhaps until now. The prospective study, including both first-time mothers and fathers, shows that pregnancy effected changes in brain structure, specifically in loss of gray matter (GM) in regions responsible for...

A new study published in the journal Pediatrics investigates a possible association between planned birth before 39 weeks gestational age and early childhood development.  It concludes that an early, scheduled delivery is linked to poor childhood development at school age.  

A population-based record linkage cohort study of those born in South Wales, Australia between 2002-2007 was performed on 153,730 live-born infants of greater than or equal to 32 weeks gestation with assessments of development in their first year of full-time school 2009 or 2012.  The five avenues interpreted: ...

contraceptive

As it stands now, the burden of contraception rests heavily on a woman’s shoulders.  Male contraceptive options have been limited to the pull-out method, condoms, and the dreaded “V’ word – vasectomy.  Understandably, most men shy away from the latter because, well - it involves cutting; and the idea of sharp instruments near the reproductive organs is unfathomable. 

Researchers have been working on alternatives to male contraception for quite some time; but while there have been some positive results, no product has made it to the market. According to results of a recent study, injectable male contraception proved to be highly effective and comparable in efficacy to female contraceptives.

The study was done across 7 countries and involved 320 healthy couples with no...

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released their annual Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Report which reflects record highs in the three most commonly reported conditions in the United States in 2015 (in the following order of descending rate of increase in cases):  primary and secondary syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia.

It is estimated there are 20 million new STDs in the U.S. every year with 50% representing those 15-24 years of age (chlamydia and gonorrhea tend to be highest in this population).  Because not all cases are properly diagnosed or reported —in conjunction with other STDs like herpes and human papillomavirus, for example, it is assumed this is an underestimation of the actual burden.  There were previous declines, but 2015 was...

Welcome to the conclusion of our three part series discussing the science behind director Kathleen Gyllenhaal's latest documentary, IN UTERO.

"To Avoid Adult Dysfunction Start 'IN UTERO'" took a deeper look at the health ramifications of toxic stress in prenatal life and its role in contributing to adult disease.

Part I of our Q&A with Gyllenhaal emphasized health, Hollywood, how a story gets told and the parallels between funding for film...

Welcome to the continuation of our series discussing the science behind director Kathleen Gyllenhaal's latest documentary, IN UTERO.  

"To Avoid Adult Dysfunction Start 'IN UTERO'" took a deeper look at the health ramifications of toxic stress in prenatal life and its role in contributing to adult disease.  Her husband, Stephen Gyllenhaal, is a producer.  

Now, we pivot to the behind-the-scenes of how and why such a story gets told.  The interview will reveal interesting...

My pregnant mom - while caring for her ill father - got a call her grandfather died.  She started to shake uncontrollably as her water broke.  Shortly thereafter, out I came  - nearly a month before I was due.

The upsetting news induced a physiologic reaction.  Current science supports this conclusion as the paradigm is ever-shifting to recognize the strong link between environment in prenatal life and health outcomes that span the spectrum into adulthood.

The film IN UTERO, directed by Kathleen Gyllenhaal, aptly articulates my battle cry after over a decade of pediatric practice.  Though intended to speak to the perils of...

In the spirit of Breast Cancer awareness month and promoting women’s health, we are excited to have had Dr. Susan Wolf in our Manhattan office today for our Making the Rounds Facebook Live video streaming series

Dr. Wolf is a Reproductive Endocrinologist specializing in infertility and menopause.  Additionally, she is a breast cancer and melanoma survivor - and, “borderline ovarian” which she personally addressed in our discussion.

This series is intended to be an interactive experience, so questions from the public are welcomed.  

With respect to her expertise, Dr. Wolf spoke on debunking myths related to infertility, menopause,...

As we enter the final stretch of so vitriolic a Presidential campaign, it is not a surprise that scandalous accusations are being thrown in all directions by both sides.  Center stage yesterday was the possibility of a Bill Clinton ‘love child.’  

The issue of paternity (aka fatherhood) predates this election throughout history.

When I toured Versailles in France, I was taken to the bedroom where Marie Antoinette gave birth.  The guide conveyed there was a ‘court’ (aka an audience of people) at the bedside that observed the actual event so proof of maternity (aka motherhood) could be established.  This always interested me since the process says nothing of paternity.

Systems have evolved since the 1700s in terms of reliability.

When I entered the field of...