sodium

A group called "World Action on Science and Health" (WASH) has declared March 20-26 as "Salt Awareness Week;" their goal being to encourage people all over the world to cut back on their salt consumption. The ostensible aim of this move is to improve health by getting people to consume no more than 5 grams of salt per day. Since salt is 40 percent sodium (the component that's the real target), that would be 2,000 mg of sodium daily. And in kitchen terms, one teaspoon of table salt would be about 2400 mg of sodium. That's not a lot of salt!

However, most of the salt we consume doesn't come from the salt shaker at meals. Instead, it's already present in most of the processed foods we eat, as shown below (courtesy American Heart Association): Hard to believe one slice of white...

The folks over at the Environmental Working Group and NRDC must be greeting a new environmental study with mixed emotions. 

On one hand, their eternally-growing list of endocrine disruptors—chemicals that supposedly screw with your hormones—has grown by one. On the other hand, the new endocrine disruptor is salt, and despite the perennially low quality science that dribbles from their websites, even they must realize how stupid this sounds. Maybe even enough worry that remotely inquisitive individuals might wonder "Hmm. Salt is disrupting my 'endocrines?' Huh?? Maybe the other endocrine stuff they write about is garbage too."

Which is pretty much what the Council has been saying forever. 

Let's look at the evidence that led researchers at the Yale School...

American Council On Science and Health: How Toxic Is Salt?

With a recent mandate in New York City that restaurant chains label menu items containing more than the recommended daily allowance for salt, the American Council on Science and Health has tackled the issue with a short consumer-level book.

 

 NEW YORK - Feb. 26, 2016 - The New York State Supreme Court recently upheld a New York City law requiring restaurants to put a special label on menu items containing more than "the recommended daily allowance" for salt.

This will once again lead to consumer confusion regarding how these salt allowances are created by government, what salt does in the body, and if it as toxic as some groups have claimed. To...

Salt Warning!Under the heading of governmental overreach, two new doozies caught my attention:

1. In the Big Apple, a New York State Supreme Court Judge Eileen Rakower upheld the Mayors Bloomberg-DeBlasio mandate to place "Danger: Lots Of Salt!" warnings on certain restaurants' food offerings containing what the regulatory overseers deem dangerous to our health. Meaning, over 2,300 mg of sodium, which authorities including the American Heart Association and the CDC assert is the upper...

Screen Shot 2016-01-08 at 10.38.13 AMEvery five years, the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture are tasked with updating the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and 2015 saw the production of the latest version. This report is not drastically different from the one published in 2010, but there are some differences, some of which make the 2015 version more science-based that the last one.

Unfortunately, some of the changes are not for the best and will...

salt-shaker-1478372-639x852The 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommend no more than 2300 mg sodium per day (about 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt) for the general population. And the American Heart Association, seconds the idea of restriction, but has an even stronger stance: 1,500 mg per day. That's equivalent to almost 4 grams of salt (sodium...

Screen Shot 2015-09-10 at 2.26.25 PMAbout a week ago, I discussed the shortsightedness of a New York City Council proposal that would limit the number of calories in McDonald's Happy Meals (and other similar promotions) to 500. Now Big Apple lawmakers are back at it again, with another food-based nanny law passed Wednesday that would require any meal with a sodium content exceeding 2,300 mg (the recommended daily amount, which is generally consumed in the form of salt), to be flagged with a salt shaker...

People line up to buy food at a fast food restaurant in Harlem in New YorkA new study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that eating at a full-service restaurant is no better for your health than eating at a fast food joint. In fact, in some cases, a full-service restaurant is less healthy.

The study, led by Ruopeng An, Ph.D. at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, included...

salt

US health officials have long warned that too much salt intake as a child can raise lifelong risk of high blood pressure. However, a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics suggests it s actually potassium intake that parents should be aware of.

The study, led by Dr. Lynn L. Moore, an associate professor of medicine at Boston University, tracked the eating habits and blood pressure of over 2,000 nine and ten year old girls for up to ten years. The researchers assessed the effect of dietary sodium and potassium on systolic (the top...

177851075 (1)Can you remember what you ate yesterday? Last week? Last month? The answer is probably not, and that s one of the major issues with nutrition research: a lot of studies rely on what is known as the Food Frequency Questionnaire, the most commonly used dietary assessment tool in which participants report the foods they ate over a defined period of time and how often they consumed them. Two new studies one examining salt intake among older adults and the other examining pizza consumption among children used this measure to make conclusions about health outcomes.

As...