sugar

Soda taxes are many things. Obnoxious. Unscientific. An example of government overreach. The one thing they aren't is racist, yet precisely that case was made by Seattle Times reporter Gene Balk1

His argument goes like this: Blacks and Hispanics consume more sugary beverages than whites and Asians, while whites and Asians drink more diet beverages than blacks and Hispanics. Because the tax does not apply to diet beverages, it is racist. 

Supporting data provided by the Seattle...

Food and nutrition companies always capitalize on whatever fad diets are currently in fashion to shamelessly promote their products. Science is of secondary concern, if it's a concern at all. For instance, Centrum Silver is running an advertisement that brags about its (utterly worthless) multivitamins being gluten- and GMO-free.

Nestlé wants in on the action, too. This company is playing a TV commercial for ProNourish, a nutritional drink. As one might expect, the company eagerly and unscientifically boasts about the product's lack of...

If this trend continues, Canadians may someday have more access to sugar than they have to ice skating. 

New government research shows that when it comes to packaged foods and beverages sold in Canada, two of every three items contain added sugar of some kind. That jarring news comes from a joint report by Public Health Ontario and the University of Waterloo, made public today. 

The labels of more than 40,000 products "sold at national supermarket chains of a major Canadian grocery retailer" in March of 2015 were analyzed, in an effort to identify any of 30 terms that indicated the presence of sugar, "everything from sugar to dextrose, high-fructose corn syrup, glucose, fructose and fruit juice concentrate," states a...

For years - no, make that decades - we've been warned about the dangers of dietary fat. It has too many calories, it leads to high cholesterol and heart disease, too much can cause obesity, and on and on. But lately we've been told that the sugar industry ("Big Sugar"?) had a hand (or perhaps an underhand) in demonizing fat so that sugar might be used to add flavor to otherwise not-so-yummy low or no fat products. There's been a fair amount of research lately that focuses on the possibly deleterious effects ot too much dietary sugar, leading to various movements to tax or otherwise inhibit sugary beverages in particular.

Apparently such occurrences are having impacts on consumers' dietary choices, perhaps not for the better.

What could be better for a dieter than non-fat...

Our consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages has been linked to virtually every illness known to man (only a slight exaggeration) — including obesity and type 2 diabetes — to name just a couple. Thus far it hasn't been blamed for most cancers — but that doesn't mean that people aren't trying to do just that. An example is a recent report in the journal Translational Cancer Research, citing data suggesting that there might be a link between recurrence of some cancers and high sugar consumption, they attempted to determine if cancer survivors had high intakes of sugar from sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). 

The senior author of the report was Dr. Melinda Sothern from LSU Health New Orleans. She and colleagues...

Too many raisins will kill you, too.

Busybodies in the American public, never content to leave other people alone, always seem to need a common enemy to rally against. For years, it was McDonald's. Then it was Monsanto and Big Pharma. Now, it's Big Soda.

At first glance, a war on soda might appear to make sense. There is no nutritional benefit to soda. Given the large and growing segment of the U.S. populace that is obese or contracting type 2 diabetes, perhaps a Pigovian tax on soda (with the aim of reducing soda consumption) makes sense. After all, the science on sugar is pretty clear: Too much of it in your diet can lead to health problems.

But a closer look at food science reveals that a tax on sugary drinks (such as soda, sports drinks, and tea), a policy being...

 

shutterstock_311932406 Gallbladder courtesy of Shutterstock

As you're probably aware, everything from obesity to baldness is being blamed on high consumption of sugar. Now there's a new ailment to add to the list — gallbladder cancer — at least according to a new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The gallbladder is a small sack (usually depicted as green) that's tucked away...

 

shutterstock_148284839 Sugar Cane in the Field via Shutterstock

For years the public has been advised that sugar is bad — and to minimize its consumption. This presents a problem for the food industry which adds sugar (and here I mean sucrose or table sugar) to a myriad of products. Even foods that you don't think of as sweet, such as ketchup, contain sugar. So how does the industry, which is required to list a product's ingredients on the label, deal with the problem of admitting they add a "bad" ingredient to their products? By...

sugar-make-us-age-1When people restrict their salt intake for a period of time, they come to prefer a lower amount their previous "normal" intake seems too salty. A recent study investigated whether the same is true for sugar consumption. If so, a period of sugar restriction might result in a preference for less sweet foods and might be a means of reducing food intake.

Writing in...

sugar-make-us-age-1

Some researchers have been saying for years that sugar, not fat, is the most dangerous dietary ingredient, causing obesity and ills ranging from diabetes to hypertension. They also suggest that the focus on decreasing dietary fat has resulted in a concomitant switch to additional added sugars.

The problem, they suggest, is that sugar (table sugar or sucrose) is made up of equal parts of two simple sugars glucose and fructose and it's the fructose that is seen as the main issue. But studies that have sought to...