sugary beverages

The famed sue-and-settle group Center for Science in the Public Interest, founded by a former employee of Ralph Nader, are in the news again. This time they are using their "health justice" little sister Praxis Project as the lead and are going after both Coca-Cola and the American Beverage Association, claiming they knew all along that soda was harmful and covered it up. You know, like Big Tobacco in the 1950s and '60s.

Bloomberg News sums it up thusly:

  • Federal court complaint alleges Coke downplayed sugar effects
  • Sugary drinks ‘are scientifically linked to obesity, diabetes’

The Praxis Project claims...

177851075 (1)Can you remember what you ate yesterday? Last week? Last month? The answer is probably not, and that s one of the major issues with nutrition research: a lot of studies rely on what is known as the Food Frequency Questionnaire, the most commonly used dietary assessment tool in which participants report the foods they ate over a defined period of time and how often they consumed them. Two new studies one examining salt intake among older adults and the other examining pizza consumption among children used this measure to make conclusions about health outcomes.

As...

1431130_82873643Polls are closed and the election results are in regarding the proposals to tax sugary beverages in Berkeley and San Francisco. The verdict? Well, you win some, you lose some.

Bad news first Berkeley is officially the nation s first city to impose a tax on sugary drinks. Measure D, imposing a 1-cent-per-ounce tax on sugar sweetened beverages - passed with 75 percent of the popular vote. The funds...

beverageToday s New York Times has an editorial entitled, The Wrong Rx for XXLs. Piqued by the title's vagueness, curiosity got the better of me, forcing me to actually read it. We were stunned to read that they were warning the City's current mayor, Bill de Blasio, NOT to resurrect from the sleeping dead pile former Mayor...

277890_6323When prescription drug can potentially have dangerous side effects or interactions with other drugs, the FDA will prescribe a so-called black box warning on the label. The point is to alert both prescribers and consumers to the possibility of negative effects on health. Now, a California lawmaker wants to extend such warnings to, would you believe it, sugary drinks.

The proposed label would read: Drinking beverages with added sugar(s) contributes to obesity, diabetes, and tooth decay."

According to an...

Screen Shot 2013-12-20 at 2.18.22 PMNot only are regular soft drinks (those sweetened by sugar) blamed for overeating and obesity, some studies have also pointed the finger at artificial sweeteners. But a new study, published in the journal Diabetes Care undermines such conclusions.

Dr....

beverageDr. Maki Inoue-Choi of the University of Minnesota and colleagues published a report in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention linking the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages to the incidence of the most common type of endometrial (uterine) cancer.

Type I endometrial cancer is thought to be associated with factors that increase estrogen exposure these include greater body fatness,...