Nutrition and Lifestyle

Apparently, you can make any claim with an Asterisk (*), so long as the asterisk clarifies that your claim isn't true. In one of Dr. Oz's latest press releases, the TV 'doc' touts apple cider vinegar (or any vinegar) as a miracle health benefit: it improves blood flow, prevents diabetes, encourages weight loss, and prevents cancer. But not too long ago on the Dr. Oz show, he caveats his claims by saying this: "As with any trend, it’s easy to get lost...

When it comes to cooking, olive oil takes the cake for nutrition, flavor, and healthy fats. So it makes sense that someone would find a reason to hate it; it's the anti-science way, after all! Internet rumors swirl about the low smoke point of olive oil and claims that reaching it is potentially toxic to your health. It isn't true, and here's why.

 

 

Some new controversy has been cooked up recently about eggs - which is a bit hard to unscramble (ok, ok - that's enough.) 

Controversy over eggs is like controversy over puppies. Or a bouquet of tulips. Or the Oscar for Best Picture.... well, forget that last one.

This time, it's not the usual "there's too much cholesterol" or "only eat the white parts" - neither of which have any basis in science, by the way. Now, the concern that is being echoed on natural food sites across the internet is that particular methods of cooking eggs, scrambling them in particular, is dangerous because heating the yolk can convert the cholesterol in it into the most dangerous form of cholesterol - very low density lipoprotein (VLDL.) 

In fact, on the website Terrific Fitness,...

A group called "World Action on Science and Health" (WASH) has declared March 20-26 as "Salt Awareness Week;" their goal being to encourage people all over the world to cut back on their salt consumption. The ostensible aim of this move is to improve health by getting people to consume no more than 5 grams of salt per day. Since salt is 40 percent sodium (the component that's the real target), that would be 2,000 mg of sodium daily. And in kitchen terms, one teaspoon of table salt would be about 2400 mg of sodium. That's not a lot of salt!

However, most of the salt we consume doesn't come from the salt shaker at meals. Instead, it's already present in most of the processed foods we eat, as shown below (courtesy American Heart Association): Hard to believe one slice of white...

Why on earth are millennials drinking collagen? That's easy: because celebrities are doing it.. DUH. Perhaps a little lesson in science is in order.

Foods are labeled with a lot of information to help consumers make the best choices based on nutritional content — see example below.

But this information isn't always used appropriately — a consumer may not understand it or not be willing to take the time to figure out what's best for him or her. So various schemes have been proposed to make choices easier, but still accurate, as we've discussed before.

In the British Commonwealth, a system called the "Traffic Light" label has been used. A group of investigators in New Zealand  wanted to ascertain whether this or another type of interpretive label would be more useful for consumers than the non-interpretive version above. Their...

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, Krispy Kreme is covering their doughnuts in green glaze. That's right - they are making green doughnuts.  

This made us here at ACSH wonder.... why are we turning our junk food green when we have plenty of great green foods available already? And, what makes food that is green everyday - not just on St. Patrick's Day - so great? 

Green foods that are naturally green (without green icing) like leafy vegetables (collards, mustard greens, turnip greens, chard, spinach, and kale) are rich in vitamins A, C, E, and K. They are also high in folate which is critical during prenatal care to prevent birth defects. Additionally, broccoli and bok choy have B-vitamins. So, there is no need to buy those expensive bottles of pills at GNC to get your...

Tom Brady is one of the best (or the best) quarterbacks to ever play the game. On top of that, he is rich and hot and married to Gisele Bündchen, who is richer and hotter. 

The couple seem to have it all - and now the online meal delivery service of pre-packaged plant-based foods, Purple Carrot, is selling the idea that you can too. It's as easy as subscribing to their newly launched meal service called TB12 Performance Meals - developed directly with Tom Brady.

Brady's diet has become a hot button issue for his fans and critics alike - in large part because of his self- proclaimed belief that it has been one of the cornerstones of his athletic success. On the Purple...

If you'd  like to play Russian roulette, but don't have a loaded gun handy, you could also try drinking raw milk. True, the chances are less loaded against you, but can still be as devastating, as evidenced by a recent outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes food poisoning attributed to a creamery in Walton, New York that specializes in unpasteurized milk products. The CDC "estimates that Listeria infection is the third leading cause of death from food poisoning in the United States. About 1,600 people get sick from Listeria each year, and about 260 die."

This particular bacteria is a nasty customer — unlike many other bugs, it can survive and grow in refrigerator temperatures, so a...

Gluten-free is one of the latest food fads to take America by storm — but does everyone who espouses a gluten-free diet really need one? Certainly, someone with celiac disease must have a gluten-free diet; but there are also other reasons a person might legitimately avoid gluten, such a a non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) or an allergy. How does one know? A recent study in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology sought to examine how reliably such determinations are made.

Dr. Javier Molina-Infante from the Hospital Universitario San...