aspirin

 

“An aspirin a day keeps the doctor away” has been the mantra for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) since the early 2000s, but that seems to be changing in some cases.

It is well documented that taking aspirin helps prevent the recurrence of heart attack, stroke, and other vascular events after they have already occurred - known as “secondary prevention”.  But there is debate over the benefits of taking aspirin in people without a history of prior cardiovascular disease - primary prevention.  The current consensus advocates using low-dose aspirin, for primary prevention, in certain high risk groups: those with advanced age, diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, smoking etc.  Not so, says a new ...

Preventive medicine via Shutterstock Preventive medicine via Shutterstock

Aspirin has one of the best benefit-to-risk ratios of any therapy for reducing risk of cardiovascular events. The drug has been shown to prevent heart attacks and ischemic stroke, which is caused by an artery-blocking clot, as well as reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) with long-term use. However, aspirin use is not without its own set of potential...

Aspirin bottle via Shutterstock

The world s largest clinical trial on aspirin was recently launched in the United Kingdom, with the aim to determine whether taking daily aspirin will stop, or delay cancers caught and treated at an early stage, from returning.

The trial is funded by the National Health Service s...

Colon and GI tractThe U.S. Preventive Services Task Force issued draft recommendations this week on the use of low-dose (81 mgm) aspirin for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and colorectal cancer (CRC) among adults aged 50-69 with an elevated risk of (but no prior history of) CVD, and for that same age group for prevention of CRC. However, the panel...

Colon and GI tractBeginning in the 1980s, numerous uncontrolled (observational) studies have indicated a potential benefit of certain painkillers for reducing the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The drugs are known as NSAIDs (pronounced EN-seds), or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. They are among the most commonly prescribed and purchased OTC medications, and the group includes Aleve, ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), Celebrex, Voltaren (diclofenac), among others. Aspirin is another.

Now a...

Screen Shot 2015-03-18 at 2.16.24 PMIt is generally accepted that the chronic use of aspirin and some other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). A new study shows that this beneficial effect may not apply to everyone.

Rapid advances in gene sequencing are starting to refine treatments for a variety of diseases (personalized medicine). Although in its infancy, this approach may eventually be useful in selecting appropriate drugs for cancer, depression, and other conditions.

New research shows that one s genetic profile may play a part in...

156977_1092The use of low doses of aspirin is known to decrease the risk of both colorectal cancer (CRC) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). On the other hand, chronic aspirin use can also cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding which can be severe. So how should one make the decision as to whether or not to use aspirin?

In order to provide insights into this important question, Dr. Rob C M van Kruijsdijk of the University of Utrecht, the Netherlands and colleagues used...

PCI and stentA study evaluating outcomes among almost 10,000 patients post-cardiac stent insertion to determine optimal duration of anti-platelet therapy provided fans of both maintaining the current 12-month schedule, and proponents of longer duration, reassurance.

How could that be? First the data: a multi-center group led by Dr. Laura Mauri of Brigham-Women s Hospital/Harvard Medical School followed a group of 9,961 patients for up to 30 months after placement of a drug-eluting coronary artery stent. The subjects were randomly divided into a 12-month...

aspirinPublished in JAMA in time to coincide with a presentation at the current American Heart Association meetings, a new controlled trial seeking aspirin s protective effect against cardiovascular disease (CVD) failed to show any benefit in terms of mortality among a large cohort of Japanese patients with risk factors.

The study authors, a group based at Waseda University in Tokyo led by Yasuo Ikeda, MD, followed 14,...

In Utero

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has issued a new report after reviewing numerous studies on the dangerous pregnancy-related condition, preeclampsia. The studies they reviewed show strong evidence for a protective effect of low-dose aspirin for reducing the risk of preeclampsia among women at higher-than-average risk of this dangerous condition. Preeclampsia was formerly known as...