genetic testing

We know that exercise is good for us, but, most of us don't do it. Only about 20% of Americans get the recommended amount of exercise. (1)

There are a lot of reasons why we don't work out. We are busy. Gyms and classes can be expensive. We don't appreciate its value and are not motivated. It is (at best) slightly uncomfortable to downright painful. And, for most people, it's not fun. 

All of these reasons work together to create a multitude of exercise fads.... all aiming to make exercise easier, faster, less painful, more fun - less exercise-y. 

And, the newest fad is trying to do just that, by making your workout more interesting and personal by incorporating ...

In the spirit of Breast Cancer awareness month and promoting women’s health, we are excited to have had Dr. Susan Wolf in our Manhattan office today for our Making the Rounds Facebook Live video streaming series

Dr. Wolf is a Reproductive Endocrinologist specializing in infertility and menopause.  Additionally, she is a breast cancer and melanoma survivor - and, “borderline ovarian” which she personally addressed in our discussion.

This series is intended to be an interactive experience, so questions from the public are welcomed.  

With respect to her expertise, Dr. Wolf spoke on debunking myths related to infertility, menopause,...

Mutated DNAAmong young women with breast cancer, the testing rates for BRCA mutation are increasing, according to research published recently in JAMA Oncology. But there were many discouraging findings among the overall trends.

Shoshana M. Rosenberg, ScD, MPH, from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues, describe the use of BRCA testing using a cross-sectional analysis of data. The article was entitled "BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Testing in Young Women With Breast Cancer...

Screen Shot 2015-05-22 at 1.30.18 PMWould you like to know if you carry a gene (or genes) that increase your risk of some disease or condition for example obesity, or some form of cancer? Well, that knowledge might be coming soon to a workplace near you.

According to a recent report in the Wall Street Journal, some firms are making it...

Pregnant!Carrier screening is a type of genetic testing performed on couples that are expecting or planning to have children to see if they may be at risk for passing a genetic disorder on to their children. In many cases, for a child to actually develop a genetic disease, both parents must be carriers of the abnormal gene. Although cystic fibrosis is the best-known disorder for which individuals are tested, there are others as well.

Now, individuals may have access to those tests without consulting a doctor. Genetic testing company 23andMe...

Pregnant!Carrier screening is a type of genetic testing performed on couples who are expecting or planning for a baby to see if they may be at risk for passing a genetic disorder on to their children. Carrier screening was previously targeted at people from certain ethnic groups, for example Ashkenazi Jews, who are at higher risk for some diseases including Tay-Sachs disease and Canavan disease. But companies who offer these screening options are now promoting them for everyone.

The tests allow for a quick screening using saliva...