President Trump

On November 8, I published an article titled, "Whoever Wins On Election Day 2016, American Science Is Still #1 In The World." That is every bit as true now as it was then.

Mr. Trump promised to be a different kind of president. So, nobody should be surprised that he is living up to his campaign pledges. However, his budget proposal for 2018 should raise some serious concerns. Cutting science funding, particularly that of the NIH, is not aligned with his goal to "Make America Great Again."

How Bad Are the Proposed Cuts?

In many ways, Mr. Trump's goal of reducing the size and scope of the federal bureaucracy is...

In Did Pompe Disease Get a New Champion in President Trump?, I discussed the significance such a spotlight as a presidential address in front of Congress and the world can have on so rare a disease. Despite the fact these types of “Orphan Diseases” individually impact small populations, collectively they affect 25 million Americans. 

Now, we will dive into why they are so important to understand, raise awareness about and divest resources for in order to advance therapeutic and potentially curative research.

Inborn Errors of Metabolism reflect a host of rare, genetic disorders that can be devastating, fatal and, in certain instances, if not swiftly detected in...

The squeaky wheel often gets the grease but sometimes wheels get an impassioned champion - and that is just as good. That may have happened with Pompe disease when President Trump, addressing a joint session of Congress, highlighted the presence of 20-year old Notre Dame sophomore Megan Crowley, who is afflicted with it.

Pompe disease results from mutations in the GAA gene which result in the inability of the body to break down the complex sugar called glycogen. That resulting buildup, especially in muscles, prevents them from functioning normally.

It's an inherited disease and relatively rare. According to the National Institutes of Health, Pompe disease affects about 1 in 40,000...

A potentially heartwarming development has occurred in recent days. A grassroots movement supporting a "Science March" has amassed a gigantic following on social media, which in turn has resulted in substantial mainstream media coverage. The website, which is still in development, says that "anyone who values empirical science" can participate. Good.

Unfortunately, some of the other statements have sent mixed messages. Consider this:

I agree 100% with every sentence. So, what's the problem?

The problem is that this message is aimed at one particular side of the political...